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An open source Unix Operating System.

Written By: Gary on March 31, 2012 No Comment

One of the easiest services I use for backing up is Dropbox. They give me a folder to store documents in and it automatically pushes a copy of those documents into the cloud (be sure to use a great password) and syncs them with my other computer; so I’ve automatically got 3 copies of the file now. I can view these files from anywhere on the internet with a web browser or with my iPhone, iPad or an Android device. If I store photos from my iPhone to Dropbox it’s now in the cloud and on my two syncing computers (and on my iPhone).

DropBox will give you 2 GB (more than 3 CDs of storage) for free. dbox-logo.pngDropbox syncs that storage with your computers plus you can view with your Android and iOS devices. Are you always sharing certain documents with a co-worker or friend? You can have a shared synchronized folder between your computers. You can even share specific photo albums via the web with friends. If you’ve got your computer synced you don’t even need to be on the internet, those files are there on the computer, if you change, add or delete any files the next time you connect it will sync everything automatically for you.

And if you get more friends to sign up (and install it) they’ll give you more free space (so please use my link for extra space). It runs on Macintosh and on Windows, the programs and apps are free! Not only do I get 500MB for free if you sign up if you follow my link, so do you (you get 500MB extra for following my link verses no bonus on your own!).

They make it incredibly easy to share photos with others, even just via their web site. You got a folder, you share the link and you’ve got a photo album shared. Super super easy.

3 GB of bonus space: After you sign up, they will then let you import directly from your camera and give you an extra 3 GB (that’s 5 GB total, about 8 CDs of back up!). This camera imports directly from you camera and from chips, it’ll also import automagically from your iPhone or other iOS device when you plug it into the computer. Even if you don’t want this feature, import in 3 GB of photos and video and then delete them, you’ll still have the space (as far as I can tell all this free space is for life). As far as I can tell, after getting the 3 GB free you can delete the photos, turn off the upload and keep the 3 GB of space…

Tip: To get more use out of all that storage, once you get a few GB of photos into the cloud, back them up to a DVD (standard DVD’s hold more than 4 GB) and make multiple copies. Keep a copy at your Mom’s house or at your kids house or in your safe deposit box. You don’t want all the copies at the same place in case there is a fire and they all burn down. Then you can delete these photos from the cloud and you’ve got more space for more photos.

Advanced features: You have options to not sync certain folders with dropbox, so if you don’t have the 5 GB of extra space on your laptop you don’t need to keep every folder synced with your netbook or MacBook Air. You could just sync your documents folder and recent photos and not worry about everything else.

Don’t like: The one thing I don’t like about the Dropbox photo import is they rename your photos with the date and time. I actually like the date and time part but I wish they just added that to the original file name, it’s hard to tell where the duplicates are with completely different filenames. But I can decide if that is important later, it’s the 3 GB of extra storage that I want for free, I can use it for anything I want later…

Another tip: Whenever I buy a new product, I try to go on-line and get the digital version of the manual for it, then I put all these documents in a folder in the cloud somewhere. Then no matter where I go, I have the manual for that computer, digital camera, car stereo, GPS unit or anything that I might be traveling with. On the other hand, I also have the manual for my stereo and stove with me too, I don’t really need those all the time, but it’s nice to have those manuals easily accessible when I need them.

Written By: Gary on September 19, 2007 One Comment

188LaptopThis is probably the best review of the XO laptop (often called the “$100 Laptop”) I’ve ever seen. This is a very cool machine and should start manufacturing this fall. Unfortunately, it wasn’t designed for US sales, but once the demand gets up there I can see it (or something similar) being offered for sale. We have similar type items in the US but not as advanced and for more than double the price.

With a (tablet-like) twist screen it’s pretty need at how it folds over. And the screen has two modes: bright color and high contrast B & W for outside viewing. It had an SD slot and three USB ports, ethernet, wireless (with the mesh network), web-cam for collaboration, works as a gaming device or sideways as an eBook reader. They had to remove the built in charging crank which is a problem if you’re in a really remote area. I’m sure separate chargers raise the price)?).

The software running on the XO is just as compelling as its hardware. The Red Hat Fedora Linux-based Sugar operating system is fairly basic, and we got comfortable using it within a few minutes. The home screen displays the XO logo within a circle, and the surrounding circle fills up with running programs. At the bottom of the screen, you’ll find the Start Menu and system application icons, including Paint, Write, Chat, and RSS.

– Laptop Magazine

I can see something like this really changing computing for a 1 to 1 ratio. This is all really most people want, e-mail, web, portability (3.5 pounds) and a 10 to 1 charging ratio. The high contrast for reading an e-book will (IMHO) give them something they don’t think they want (lots of text on the go). Add some bluetooth to get on-line on my phone and I’m in. And it runs Red Hat Linux for an OS. I want one of these puppies more than an iPhone.

Written By: Gary on April 6, 2007 No Comment

So PC World has a story on the Best 50 Tech products. Considering a few of the items in the list, I think few things are missing: Skype, one of the early pieces of ZIP/StuffIt software, maybe a Palm (or even Windows) cell phone, a TRS-80, the Sony WalkMan set standards for portable (choose your own) music players and I’m sure I’ll think of a few more later. Half of the software “tools” seem to be things to fix parts/utilities missing from the Windows OS. And there isn’t any software for creating web pages / FTPing files (from the era of Netscape and Eudora) or blocking spam. Should flickr or Google be considered a product? Amazon or eBay? Okay, so I’m getting ahead of myself, lets show the list.

Of the 50 I’ve bolded items owned/used (some were free or work owned for my use) and added comments to many items (even ones I don’t use):

  1. Netscape Navigator (1994) – Netscape and NCSA made the Internet (and Eudora), thanks!
  2. Apple II (1977) – I never owned one until years later when I got a deal on one.
  3. TiVo HDR110 (1999) – Early adoptor and I’ve added many converts
  4. Napster (1999)
  5. Lotus 1-2-3 for DOS (1983) – More of a VisaCalc/Excell user but they’re all great.
  6. Apple iPod (2001) – I waited for a color one with a big hard drive and spent the early adopter prices for it (now better ones are 1/2 the price).
  7. Hayes Smartmodem (1981) – I can’t be sure I actually had a Hayes, but I had one of the first generics if I didn’t (I’ve had so many modems, I can’t recall). Hayes changed computer communications IMHO.
  8. Motorola StarTAC (1996) – Several of these from several carriers and they were all awesome.
  9. WordPerfect 5.1 (1989) – I used it but I’m not proud, I think it’s awful
  10. Tetris (1985)
  11. Adobe Photoshop 3.0 (1994) – This has almost always been too complicated for any needs I’ve ever had.
  12. IBM ThinkPad 700C (1992)
  13. Atari VCS/2600 (1977) – I always wanted one of these (even years later) but I never had one.
  14. Apple Macintosh Plus (1986) – I was a late apple adaptor but I loved it. I still love Apple and I think I always will…
  15. RIM BlackBerry 857 (2000) – no interest in one of these ever
  16. 3dfx Voodoo3 (1999) – I don’t think I’ve ever had a machine with this card.
  17. Canon Digital Elph S100 (2000)
  18. Palm Pilot 1000 (1996) – I jumped on the palm bandwagon late but now I’m a fan
  19. id Software Doom (1993)
  20. Microsoft Windows 95 (1995) – I’m sure one of my work Machines ran this, I’m not sure if I ever owned a machine with it. I think I jumped from Windows 3.1 back to DOS and then to ME or 98 at home.
  21. Apple iTunes 4 (2003) – THE best/easiest way to shop for music on-line
  22. Nintendo Game Boy (1989)
  23. Iomega Zip Drive (1994) – These folks dominated the market. Everyone I know had one of these drives and then they just faded away…
  24. Spybot Search & Destroy (2000)
  25. Compaq Deskpro 386 (1986) – We sold these and I’ll always remember the customer that pronounced it Comp-A-Que and we had no idea what they were asking for.
  26. CompuServe (1982) – Had an account for a while, this was pre-Internet…
  27. Blizzard World of Warcraft (2004)
  28. Aldus PageMaker (1985) – I have never been a PageMaker fan.
  29. HP LaserJet 4L (1993)
  30. Apple Mac OS X (2001) – It just works! (generally)
  31. Nintendo Entertainment System (1985)
  32. Eudora (1988) – Probably one of the best e-mail clients ever, way way way before it’s time.
  33. Sony Handycam DCR-VX1000 (1995)
  34. Apple Airport Base Station (1999)
  35. Brøderbund The Print Shop (1984) – This was why people never wanted to get rid of their dot matrix printers (the pinfeed paper for banners).
  36. McAfee VirusScan (1990)
  37. Commodore Amiga 1000 (1985) – I always wanted one of these!
  38. ChipSoft TurboTax (1985) – I love tax software, it’s so worth the money
  39. Mirabilis ICQ (1996)
  40. Creative Labs Sound Blaster 16 (1992) – This was the standard for audio cards forever.
  41. Apple HyperCard (1987) – Best software ever! This was the premiere application using hyperlinks and (almost) had plug-ins and supported multimedia. Think linking and interactive pages (cards) of information and graphics all running on your computer (pre-internet)
  42. Epson MX-80 (1980) – These were one of the most durable dot matix printers ever.
  43. Central Point Software PC Tools (1985)
  44. Canon EOS Digital Rebel (2003) – I love this it feels like a real camera in my hands. It works like one too.
  45. Red Hat Linux (1994) – Awesome easy to use/maintain version of a free OS.
  46. Adaptec Easy CD Creator (1996) – I have/use various versions of it, but I’ll always love toast.
  47. PC-Talk (1982)
  48. Sony Mavica MVC-FD5 (1997) – The floppy disk cameras made it easy for everyone to get their photos off the camera. This was always my favorite camera to have schools use.
  49. Microsoft Excel (1985) – Excel is an awesome spreadsheet.
  50. Northgate OmniKey Ultra (1987)

Here’s a complete list for “printing” but I’m not sure if it’ll link properly (at the bottom of the page are just the items).

Written By: Gary on March 12, 2007 One Comment

So I picked up a Buffalo WHR-G54S Wireless Broadband Router because you can never have too many routers in your house but mostly because ever since wireless existed I’ve wanted someway to bridge across my house (mostly to hook some old non-WiFi equipment that was in the living room hooked to the stereo) for older equipment that wireless wasn’t an option. So I just wanted a box with an ethernet and an antenna that would then connect to the network. The stuff I tried was too expensive (although that was a few years back) didn’t work as advertised or didn’t pass Appletalk packets. In general, my favorite home router is the Netgear brand wireless routers but I thought I’d try thing.

So the packaging on the Buffalo WHR-G54S made me think it would work (or that I could make it work). It seemed like a nice wireless router but it looked like it wouldn’t do what I wanted, but more importantly I knew I could make it work with the DD-WRT project. This is pretty much a way to put a different OS inside the router and it supports a lot more options, it’s kind of a mini-linux (it might actually be all linux now, mildly confused on that) and there are a few projects like this out there. The most important option (for me) is by being a bridge (a mega-bridge that I can hook 5 computers up to). But it’ll also support radius authentication (if you need it, it’s a big deal), a mini web-server and even a way to power (and charge) your internet cafe.

Warning the content gets pretty geeky from here on.So you have to flash it with a new OS which is mildly tricky, I recommend printing the instructions and crossing out all the non-relevant stuff. It was pretty simple once I found the parts to ignore. Once done it was pretty much how you’d expect any wireless router to be (but better).

It had an option to be a the bridge I wanted this meant I could take any old computer that had ethernet and make it wireless by just plugging it in the router and it would connect to my wireless connect in the other room. I told it what my network was and it was ready to go. This would also be handy for running operating systems that don’t have support for some odd wireless card or USB dongle. Not only would it let me hook up 4 devices it could actually use the 5th port too (that’s probably overkill but it does it anyways).

It’ll run a little web server too. I haven’t figured out all the parts but I will. What I’d like is to set it up like a regular router and as soon as you connect it’ll give you a default web page welcoming you to the network (I figure if I can make this work I can more easily convince my local hangouts to WiFi.)

As a router goes, it supports the blocking options that many routers support but it has 10 different definable options by IP number than you can use (plus you can block by keyword and URL).

Other stuff: It supports multiple DDNS Services (Dynamic Domain Name Services), multiple VLANs, and some VPN stuff. Also some QoS options (Quality of Services) which might be handy if you don’t want those computers sucking up all your bandwidth (just lower their limit). You can telnet in and all sorts of fun stuff.

Written By: Gary on July 2, 2006 No Comment

So speaking of free products for your computer there is Open Source (this means free) Word Processing, Spreadsheet and Presentation sotware called OpenOffice and it’s no where near as daunting to install as Linux is. OpenOffice is available for Windows and Linux the latest Alpha of the Macintosh version was just released yesterday. The Macintosh version is called NeoOffice 2.0 Alpha 4 (for OS X 10.3 or better) (Alpha means it’s still in testing).


By default it’s in English but 53 other language packs are available. It’s still an Alpha release (testing) but you can still get version 1.22 (but 1.22 doesn’t work on the Intel Macs). There is an actual version of generic Open Office for Mac but it requires X11 installed (which makes the process way more complicated) and it’s not as seamless IMHO. I’ve used this and recommend it to most of my Mac friends.

Written By: Gary on July 1, 2006 No Comment

In case you missed it:

Paid incident support and critical security updates for Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, and Windows Me will end on July 11, 2006. No other security updates will follow after this date.

– Microsoft Web Site

This is interesting and I’m wondering what kind of security risks will this lead to? Have all the security bugs been found in these versions of Windows? If people still have computers running this OS are those machines capable of running Windows XP? Or Vista? Probably not, so are they going to spend the money on a new OS just so they can run Windows 2000?

I knew this was coming and I was reminded today by a Linux magazine called Tux (Tux is the penguin mascot for Linux) their “selling point” is it’s “The First and Only Magazine for the New Linux User”. I say “selling point” because like the Linux operating system, it’s free also. Do you see where I’m going with this? If you’re thinking of erasing your system anyways, why not try Linux now?


Really the easiest way to try Linux is with some installation CDs or DVDs. Tux really likes the KDE environment but I don’t see downloadable disc images anywhere (that’s clear enough for me to make a recommendation for one distribution) but I do see them for Fedora so I’m going to recommend downloading RedHat Fedora which is what I use (when I use). But if you don’t know how to work with burning ISO images and such the easiest option is probably to just go buy a Linux magazine from some bookstore that comes with CDs/DVDs (but be sure if you don’t have a DVD play you get a magazine with CDs). Or you can pick up a book with a set of CDs or DVD so that you can try it out just make sure the copyright of the book is at least 2006 so you know you’re getting a recent version. Sure it’s different from Windows, but XP is pretty different from Windows 98…

If you aren’t aren’t familiar with the terms “Open Source” or “Linux” you probably don’t want to dabble with this. So skip this and just cough up that $100+ for a new version of Windows (and the $200 for the new version of Office to go with it). That is unless you’re familiar with the term “Free”.

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Written By: Gary on August 10, 2005 One Comment

So here’s an idea! After you put linux on your iPod, try installing a copy of Doom. Here’s a short video clip, it’s pretty impressive (even to a non-gamer like me); I figure some of the delay is part of movie clip. Here’s the info for what you need ipod. I think it’s actually free (legally). I’m sure it’s not easy to install.

Written By: Gary on November 12, 2004 2 Comments

Push each letter of the alphabet in your browser and pick the first web site (blog) that comes up. A-Z…


Angle Rants
Bye Blog
Colby and Beyond
Design by Fire
Earth Observatory (blue marble)
Forever Immortalized
Green Desire
Haiku of the Day
Incogoblog
Jenni
Lorna girl
Mutated Monkeys
Neil Gaiman
One Girl’s life
Purple Stars
QBQrat (Ioblata)
Random Fate
Self Taught Girl
Tenth Muse
Unix Wix
Via Jeans
Web Mistris
Xbox Linux
Yamaha (the confused corporation)
Zongrilia (swirl)

FYI – I tried to pick blogs if they came up. If they hadn’t posted in months and I had another option, I picked that. If not I picked the closest interesting one that’d I’d recommend.

Written By: Gary on September 6, 2004 No Comment

A new adventure game, coming out for just about every platform (Windows, Macintosh, Linux/X11, BeOS, Palm OS and Pocket PC). Be sure to check out the site and the trailer.

This won’t be out until September, what really excites me is the multi-platform deployment all at the same time. If we start seeing more of this in the future it’ll really level out the playing field in computer OSes

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Written By: Gary on August 15, 2004 2 Comments

So I’m trying a three columns layout. It should really work as well as the two did unless I missed something minor. It doesn’t look well in IE on OS X (but not much looks good in it), but I don’t think anything overlaps in any version that you can’t read the content. Any the things that tend to goof up when things do that are the “extra things” which have no necessary content (links, rolls, etc.) even though it’s good content! I’ve tried this on a few OS X, Windows XP and Linux Fedora browsers and it’s pretty consistent.

I’ll be changing the colors and such soon, I just need to make sure that this holds up okay…

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Written By: Gary on June 12, 2004 No Comment

Today was a nice day, I’ve been working on my To Do list and adding things almost as fast as I can cross them off. But I’ve been getting lots done. The one annoying thing was buying an additional bathroom rug (which I thought I did a week or two ago but searched the house/car/house/car many times for) and after being home 5 minutes I found the one I already bought… Back to Kohls!

One of the High School teachers was having a barbecue and I got an invite which was nice, sometimes things like that just go out to the specific buildings and I don’t hear about them. I’m on that odd borderline of Administrator or Person, depends who you talk to, what their mood is and how upset people are with other administrators. It was a lot of fun, we grilled, played croquet ate and played with the kids. There were some babies, one that finally warmed up to me and let me carry here around, and some older kids. Got to meet some spouses and that’s always interesting. I felt bad taking off as some others were showing up but the allergies had been starting to kick in and and then the neighbor started mowing (cut grass is my kryptonite).

On the way home, talked to some older gentleman at Borders who was looking at the O’Reiley’s Essential Blogging book and hopefully I gave him some good info, he want to get into it but wasn’t sure where to start. I pushed Movable Type but suggested TypePad if he just wanted to try it out. I found a few winners myself: Two 2004 O’Reiley’s books PHP & MySQL and and Pocket Linux guide.

Plus I found out a person I dated was getting married soon. For some reason I always find that interesting when I find it out about someone…

Written By: Gary on May 21, 2004 No Comment
1. What kind of computer do you have? Describe it for me! (Like how big is your hard drive, how much memory you have…)
My main G4 PowerBook is work’s actually, but it’s be come my main one everywhere. The 12 inch screen makes it so portable! One GHz, 60GB, 768MB RAM, CD/DVD-R/W, 802.11G. It’s nice. It’ll plug into my cell phone for Internet access too! The desktop is pretty much the same thing without the wireless and a few extra external drives with a 1.3GHz G4 upgrade card. Remember that 1.3 GHz on a G4 is faster then a P4 (probably more like 2.0 (or 2.5?). And I have an XP machine mostly so I can synchronize my Palm OS phone and go to web sites that people weren’t capable of making OS X compatible…
2. How long have you had your computer? Do you plan on getting a new one soon?
The laptop is new, so no. The desktop recently got that upgrade card so I’ll wait a while for that. The XP machine is fast enough to sync my palm so no. I’d like something faster to control the music for my stereo…
3. How many computers do you have in your home? Are they networked/firewalled?
Hmm… I’ve got another old one running Linux (just for fun) and another old one controlling the music on my stereo. Firewalled? Heck yeah, I’ve got two hardware firewalls. They’re cheap enough these days! Battery backups (on everything) and an alarm system to go with the rest of it.

From Weekend Wonderings

Written By: Gary on April 22, 2004 No Comment
  1. A geek– Hey, who handles tech support at your place? You? …the six year old? …or someone from outside? …and how about in your web space? No, we’re not looking for techs; we’re just curious . I’m it in my family, I do all my own web space (including my own Movable Type installation stuff). I’m the house that relatives call/visit when upgrading stereo or computer equipment.
  2. in the– computer? Just a curiosity for the designer types: what Operating System are you running? …and which browser? Since sites can show up differently in different browsers it’s more than a casual question. Macintosh OS X mainly (sometimes Windows, sometimes Linux). Mostly using Safari.
  3. Family– Do any family members read your place? Do they care? Do they have a clue? …and how about your ‘off line’ friends? …or do you supply a little bit of separation there? My mom stumbled upon it when visiting a relative, they decided to send me mail (and found my ‘blog). She didn’t say much about it, I have no idea if her and/or other relatives read it. I don’t mention it to friends generally. If they find it they find it… I usually don’t complain and I always avoid talking about dating so how much trouble can I get into?!?

From Thursday Threesome

Written By: Gary on March 14, 2004 No Comment

I don’t know where the time has gone… I’ve been working on a few projects and things but not my blog (actually a little, just not stuff you’ve seen yet. I’ve been at one of my favorite conferences MACUL did a presentation (that I’ve never done before) that went well. Missed two Liz Phair concerts (wasn’t feeling well so I couldn’t do to the drive to Chicago and back), she did a regular concert and played at the Apple Store the next day.

So since I didn’t go there I didn’t get to see Heather either… But she’s in England with Nan for the so she might have some extra interesting posts this week. Finally bought an Xbox to play / hack around with, trying to install Linux, no success yet, but it’s been fun (anyone in the Detroit/Dearborn area who can offer me some help…?). Reading some books which I never seem to remember to comment on. The EXTRA nice part is it’s been sunny the last few days and that’s always nice in the winter!

Written By: Gary on February 27, 2004 One Comment

I’ve been in computers for a long time now. Back before The Apple Macintosh has been around for most of that time. I do not understand how it has not dominated the market. It always reminds me of Sony and Beta (you do remember Beta don’t you?). Beta was the superior competitor to VHS but look what happened to that…

It’s just some of the software and how much easier they make it. Anyone can figure out how to convert and store photos from their digital camera, create a jukebox, edit movies and burn it all to an impressive looking looking DVD. Of course it’s the iLife applications that I’m talking about, they come free with any Macintosh these days.

I thought Macs were a little easier to use even when iLife didn’t exist. It’s always been it little be easier to me. It’s not that I have any problem learning, I’ve programed computers from assembly code to fortran any used operating systems from Atari to pSystem to Linux. Macs are definitely a little bit more money but I always think it’s worth it.

I just got the new version of iLife but haven’t had much time to play with it but it even has a few more features that makes you DVDs even look more professional. The iPhoto program is supposed to be a lot faster and store more photos, but I don’t use it for much other than red-eye reduction. They also have a new program called Garage Band to create your own music.

Written By: Gary on February 22, 2004 No Comment

So I’ve been messing around with changing the CSS (background) for this blog. There should now be some space between each of the 3 boxes that make up the screen. That’s not all I was trying to do but CSS is such a pain. I’d get it working and then check it out on six different browsers on three different platforms (OS X, Windows and Linux) and it always looked funny on one of them (generally IE on Mac or Win).

So if it doesn’t look very good, please let me know…

If anyone geeky out there can tell me why I shouldn’t switch to tables for this instead of CSS columns, please let me know. It seems like with tables I’d just have two boxes and the browser would keep everything even and wrap nicely…

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Written By: Gary on January 5, 2004 No Comment

I’m addicted to blog! (To be hummed to the rhythm of Robert Palmer’s tune.)

Then: So I thought Heather was crazy (crazier) when she told me about this Movable Type software she was using for her blog. I mean there are about 80 jillion ways she could be keeping this diary(?) on-line, why Movable Type? I had even seen it before and thought it was interesting, but still… I’m the guy who still hardcodes his own HTML and I just didn’t get it.

Now: It’s like wow! I’m not even talking about the software just the posting is kinda cool. It’s like therapy without having to make the appointment. I don’t know if anyone is reading but it’s not like your shrink is really listening anyways…

Okay, back to Movable Type: This is very cool software at a nice price. It kinda violates what web servers were originally supposed to do: serve documents with out altering (parsing) them. MT just parses and parses and if you loop it right, it parses it again. Actually it does all the parsing beforehand, but it’s really hard to tell. But that’s all fine because what it does is do exactly what the web was originally supposed to do (actually what the pages were supposed to do). Wait, I’m not contradicting myself (yet), there’s a big difference between the web and web servers and web pages.

Part of what web pages were supposed to do is provide text, emphasize different blocks of text (headings, bold and italics) and link pages together. This was so that you could use any kind of browser and it could show you how you want to see the text. (I’m doing most of this from memory, it’s a blog not a research paper.) This also helped to make the pages accessible to the blind (flashing graphics with text dancing around generally cannot be read aloud to the blind by the computer). I was always surprised there wasn’t a web browser that didn’t show you just the headings any then you clicked on it to get the content below it; one reason is probably that people never format text the way it was intended so it wouldn’t work very well. (Did you know the guy who designed(?) the web, it’s a shame I can’t think of his name, just got Knighted?) But now we have different kinds of syndication (xml, rss, etc.) which does (almost) exactly the same thing, MT almost forces you to create your pages this way. Actually the less you know about programming the more likely you are to create good formatted pages. It’s amazing.

Why don’t I post more: Besides having the time? When I have the time – Half the time I can’t decide what to post. The other half of the time I’m playing around with it from the geekier side, it reminds me of the good old days on Unix working with Lex and Yacc. Wow, talk about full circle, I’m back to using Linux (Unix) and parsing text…

PS – Thanks Heather!

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